Buying Backlinks for SEO: Is It Good or Bad?

If you have ever read about SEO and legal marketing, you should already be acquainted with the term of backlinking. Moreover, you should understand why backlinks are an essential part of SEO for all websites, including law firms.

However, everyone who has tried building backlinks knows how hard this is and how much time and effort it requires. After all, the fact that many SEO agencies and experts offer backlink-building services is not a coincidence.

So, if you’re wondering whether to purchase backlinks to rank your law firm’s website, this is the blog post for you. Here, we will explain all the pros and cons of buying backlinks. Keep reading to find out whether you should invest in backlinks as soon as possible.

The pros of buying backlinks

Pros Of Buying Backlinks

By far the biggest advantage of buying backlinks is time saved. Outsourcing your work to a third party will save you hundreds of work hours that you would otherwise spend on personal link building efforts.

A rapid increase in ranking power is the second notable advantage of buying backlinks. This happens because some SEO companies deploy numerous bots to do the heavy lifting. In essence, your law firm will quickly gather an incredible number of backlinks from various sites. However, this is not the optimal link building strategy, as we will explain later in this article.

Law firms can benefit from buying backlinks in other ways as well. For example, your SEO company can use their connections and write guest pieces on high authority websites. By passing valuable link juice to your firm’s site, it allows your law website to rank more easily.

Buying backlinks is a relatively inexpensive method. The fact that you can buy links at very low prices is the main reason why law firm owners and webmasters in general decide to go down this road. This is especially true for small legal companies that are looking for short-term success.

By simply purchasing links from various sources, websites quickly rank for their relevant keywords. This increases the traffic volume and sends new clients that small websites would otherwise be unable to attract.

All of this has lead to the creation of an entire industry of companies buying domains and links every two to three months and reaping short-term benefits from it, before the search engines penalize them.

The cons of purchasing backlinks

Cons Of Buying Backlinks

If you’re starting to think about buying backlinks, you might want to rethink your options. You need to understand that this is never risk-free, despite what people may claim.

Search engine algorithms are getting better and better at tracking suspicious link behavior, and it’s only a matter of time before your bought links are removed. This can be done either by the backlink agency that sold you links or by the search engines.

If the links remain in place, Google may suddenly decide not to count them towards your page rank. A sudden increase in the number of backlinks is a sign that points towards unnatural links.

In any case, you will lose your rank just as quickly as you got it. Your website might even be deindexed and removed entirely from the search engines. When that happens, you may as well delete your site, because it will be invisible to nearly everyone.

Aside from that, it’s practically impossible to know what type of backlinks you will get when you buy them. Even if you somehow manage to avoid Google penalties for longer periods of time.

Further, if the links are cheap, it’s probably for a reason – they are easy to detect and remove. The more expensive links typically require regular monthly payments, if you want them to remain in place. In other words, you don’t have any control over your backlinks.

The fate of your website rank lies entirely in the hands of the link provider. This is especially true for public blog network (PBN) links.

The agency that sells backlinks might even be a legitimate business, but you still might get nothing in return for your money. You can never be sure that the websites – and your links with them – will not be deindexed by the latest Google algorithm update.

Forget about any long term plans if you decide to purchase links. Your law firm business will have to rest entirely on short term thinking and planning.

Now, before we end this article, let’s mention one more important thing. Buying backlinks is not explicitly forbidden, but it is a form of cheating. There’s no two ways about it. Buying backlinks is cheating and it should bring up all sorts of moral and ethical questions.

Should you be buying backlinks?

Whether or not you decide to try buying backlinks is completely up to you and your judgement.

However, you should know one thing before you take any action. Honest, sustainable link building and content promotion is the only SEO strategy that will work in the long term. Bear this in mind before you invest even a cent of your money in buying backlinks.

If you’re looking for an recommended SEO Company that doesn’t buy backlinks, check out my review of BluShark Digital.

Do you have any good experience in buying backlinks?  Did it work out for your site?  Please feel free to leave any feedback in the comments.

2 thoughts on “Buying Backlinks for SEO: Is It Good or Bad?”

  1. I’ve bought back links – they don’t work and was done before I learned SEO. I really like your website and want to subscribe to your newsletter.

    Here’s a question that I have – I have 3 websites. One for my general practice. one for Cannabis, one for immigration – was that foolish of me?

    should I have just one website for my entire practice?

    1. Hi Thomas!

      Thanks for your comment. The very lawyerly and always accurate answer is “it depends,” but the i’ll try to be more nuanced. If you have the time/energy to run multiple websites, then it is better to have multiple websites. It’s better for a website to be focused on a niche than try to do everything at once. Also the name of your website/URL matter; if you own “cannabis-lawyer.com”, you’ll get an SEO boost for cannabis lawyer keywords (and obviously you wouldn’t want to use that URL for your immigration practice).

      Does that answer your question Thomas? It’s a good one, and might merit its own full article.

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